2014 Conference Presentations

For information and handouts from the sessions,

click on the + in front of the title.

01. Role of Youth in Informing, Framing, and Developing a Local and Statewide Response to Issues- MN Alliance With Youth

Presentation            Handout

Abstract

Voices of youth are often lost in the work of collective impact initiatives, especially those tackling the issue of the achievement gap. This session will explore what works for integrating youth in the planning & decision-making of initiatives aimed at addressing the graduation crisis in Minnesota.

Objective

  • Promising Practices: What has worked in building youth-adult partnerships from both a youth and adult perspective
  • Trends: What youth in MN say are the key issues facing their communities and what they believe should be done to address them from public policy to philanthropy
  • Innovative Ideas: How to integrate youth voice in authentic ways at both a local/community level and at a systems/statewide-level for collective impact initiatives

Target Audience

The audience for this workshop would be suited for everyone: youth, educators, policy makers, elected officials, and community members.

Presenters

Kori Redepenning, MN Alliance With Youth       Melissa Burwell, MN Alliance With Youth

02. Racial Equity Journey from Theory Into Practice -St. Paul Public Schools

Presentation

Abstract

This presentation will focus on SPPS’ racial equity journey from: Theory to Practice. This presentation will use SPPS as a case study to deeply examine educational equity in public schools. SPPS is in our third year of our racial equity transformational work. SPPS will share our systems work as well as the on the ground racial equity work. This will include organizational change as well as culturally responsive pedagogy.

Objective

  • The key elements of SPPS Racial Equity Transformation
  • How to build support for a racial equity policy
  • The key components of SPPS’ racial equity policy and how it is aligned to the district vision
  • The importance of a policy to codify current racial equity work in progress and to lead current practices district-wide
  • The process of creating and building buy-in for a racial equity policy in a public forum

Target Audience

Leaders and members of community, education and public entities. Supporters and activists of racial equity development to interrupt practices and policies that are both disproportionate and predictable by race.

Presenters

Michelle Bierman, Director, Office of Equity, St. Paul Public Schools

03. Collaboration for Success: The MPS MOA with the American Indian Community - MPS and Migizi Comm.

Presentation            Handout

Abstract

In this session, participants will learn about the development of Minneapolis Public Schools’ MOA with the American Indian community designed to dramatically improve outcomes for Minneapolis Native students. Participants will learn about the planning process and content of the MOA and gain insight into how they may replicate this in their own community.

Objective

  • Real change must come from a real partnership between the community and the Minneapolis Public Schools with all stakeholders stepping forward in good faith for our American Indian youth.
  • A document in and of itself cannot undo generations of underachievement; the Memorandum of Agreement is a trigger, a touchstone that unites stakeholders and signals a larger community-wide, capacity-building movement that will steadily build pathways for our youth.
  • American Indians have a unique, federally-recognized status as members of sovereign nations and their history with public education is painful and traumatic; healing must occur to allow positive open dialogue about the goals of today’s education.

Target Audience

The session will be best suited for school district administrators, community members, andschool board members. Attendees will gain insight into how the collaborative work of the MOA is making change within Minneapolis Public Schools and gain insights into how they can begin a similar process in their own community. They will learn about best practices for forming this type of long term collaboration, as well as lessons learned by the community and schools

Presenters

Danielle Grant, Director of Indian Education, Minneapolis Public Schools;  Graham Hartley, Director of Programs Migizi Communications

04. African Teachers and Pedagogy: Practice, Disposition, and Strategy in the Urban Context - Metropolitan State University

Abstract:

Scholars have discussed, debated, and declared the need for an increase in African American teachers as a major concern during the past decade. However, maintaining growth of African American teachers continues to be a daunting task for the field of education. The reality is that while the ethnic diversity of the school-aged population increases, the K-12 teaching populace becomes more homogeneous in terms of ethnicity. In this session, African American educators share and examine researched and discovered practices, dispositions, and strategies that can enhance teaching in the urban context. The session is framed by research on the African American teacher and aligns with culturally responsive pedagogical approaches. Participants will engage in activity and discussion to identify approaches that can impact academic success for urban learners who are most often African American.

Objectives:

  • Examine the historical and current status of the African American teacher.
  • Explore the impact of learned practices, dispositions, and strategies that can enhance school success for African American students.
  • Consider the correlation of race, class, and culture on academic success for African American males.

Target Audience:

K-12 teachers, school administrators, teacher educators, community leaders, parents, school counselors.

Presenters

Nadine Haley, Associate Professor, Metropolitan State University,

Sherron Taylor, Teacher, West Metro Education Program

05. Preparing Future Teachers for Cultural Competence and Culturally Responsive Teaching to Deliver Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in the Classroom - Alexander Hines Winona State University

A Research Project Design for Students in Educational Foundations Research and Foundations – Human Learning and Development

Abstract

The proposal topic is critical and will address a year-long research project, training, and diversity and cultural competence assessments to enhance the skill set of future teachers to deliver culturally relevant pedagogy in the classroom that will facilitate students’ positive adjustment (i.e. academic, social, and behavioral) to school. This workshop will provide participants with ideas to create courses, workshops or continuing education courses that address diversity and cultural competence from an academically cognitive approach and a psychosocial theoretical development ideology to not only enhance the skill set of students but also for the professional development of student affairs practitioner’s to enhance their core competencies in multicultural awareness, knowledge and skills.

Objectives

  • Participants will engage in professional education experiences in conventional and technology aided instruction programs with professionals from the broad range of diverse groups. The active participation of candidates from diverse cultures and with different experiences is solicited, valued, and promoted in classes, field experiences, and clinical practice. Students reflect on and analyze these experiences in ways that enhance their development and growth as professionals.
  • To develop current and future educators who can help all students learn or support their learning through their professional roles in schools. Future educators who can reflect multicultural and global perspectives that draw on the histories, experiences, and representations of students and families from diverse populations will prepare students for academic success and post-secondary education.
  • Current and future educators will learn the importance of building and maintaining relationships with their students, parents and communities that are fluid and equitable in order to demonstrate support for their students. These future teachers will learn that creating bonds with students and developing a “community of learners,” will mean that all students can work collaboratively to become responsible for each other’s learning. Ladson-Billings maintains that in order for teachers to use culturally relevant pedagogy.
  • Training teachers and professionals for cultural competency may seem like an added expense for schools, but the benefits greatly outweigh the cost. Students will learn to respect different cultures and accept other cultures’ belief systems, norms, values and traditions; teachers can incorporate parents/family, cultural ways of learning into lesson plans in building an inclusive learning environment which creates a sense of belonging for all students. Our classrooms are changing, and with that change brings opportunities for students to experience positive adjustment (academic, social and behavioral) to school.
  • Presenters

    Rinnel Atherton

    Alexander Hines Winona State University

06. Beyond Talk: Augsburg College’s Cross-Institutional Action to Increase Recruitment and Retention of Future Teachers of Color

Presentation

Abstract

How does a team of education faculty and marketing and admissions staff work to increase the number of teachers of color? We’ll demonstrate how our department’s race-conscious policies and practices work and share how necessary collaboration is to creating effective messaging for “non-traditional” student recruitment and admissions.

Objective

  • Our goal is to increase audience members’ capacity to initiate cross-institutional collaborations to recruit and retain a diverse teacher candidate pool and identify target profiles to develop effective messaging for recruitment and admissions.
  • We hope that audience members will better understand how Augsburg’s policies and practices address retention and licensure of future teachers of color and will share in our urgency to recruiting, retaining, and licensing a teacher workforce that mirrors the cultural, religious, racial, economic, and linguistic diversity of students in classrooms across our cities and state.

Target Audience

Program managers; non-profit and higher-ed administrators. Educators interested in recruiting future teachers of color are welcome.

Presenters

Audrey Lensmire, PhD, Assistant Professor, Education Department, Director, East African Student to Teacher (EAST) program

Judy Johnson, Associate Director of Admissions

Nancy Shaeffer, Assistant Director Graduate Admissions

Vicki Olson, PhD, Professor, Education Department, Master of Arts in Education Program Director

Jeanine Gregoire, PhD, Professor and Chair, Education Department

Rebecca John, Vice President, Marketing and Communication

07. Solutions, Not Suspensions: Youth Voices- Cymone Fuller, MMEP and Dr. David Stovall,

Video coming soon!        Handout

Abstract

On February 12th, MMEP will be hosting Solutions in ACTION! a day focused on students and staff and how they can begin working together to effectively transform discipline in their schools to improve behavior and responses for everyone. Students will brainstorm fair and equitable responses for inappropriate behavior and come up with action plans, so they can be involved with their school administration to advocate for and/or implement equitable, supportive discipline policies and practices.

We will be presenting and summarizing some of the highlights from that youth summit and the action plans students developed to work with their schools to address school discipline policies and practices.

Objective

  • To introduce thoughts and ideas generated by the Youth Voices at the Equity Summit for Youth
  • To introduce the student-devised plans to reduce suspensions in their schools.
  • To report on techniques they learned to approach the issue in their schools effectively.

Target Audience

The target audience is anyone who works with young people – and young people – who wish to reduce suspensions among young people of color.

Presenters

Cymone Fuller, coordinator of MMEP’s Solutions not Suspension program

David Stovall, keynote

Youth participants and cosponsors from Solutions in ACTION!

08. No Child is Born a Racist: The Impact of Systemic Anti-Racist Student Leadership Development on Students, Schools, and Communities. Dr. Patrick Duffy, MPS and Anthony Galloway, WMEP

Abstract
What if Rosa had actively began her training in organizing in middle school?  What if the next Nelson Mandela is sitting in your classroom right now?  Wouldn’t you like to give them a jump start?  In this session we will learn collaboratively about the development of an interracial student leadership Network in the west metro called Dare 2 Be Real (D2BR) that has grown in numerous middle schools, high schools, and colleges.  There are over 500 students activiely engaging in courageous conversations and leadership development around active Anti-Racism.  Through the testimony and personal narrative of youth, adults, and an exploration of the impact of critical race theory on curriculum design and instructional delivery, we will explore ways in which students can internalize anti-racism as a part of their individual and collective mission.

Objectives

Participants will be able to understand a framework and timeline for implementing student anti-racist leadership in secondary schools, begin to develop a plan for implementing student anti-racist leadership development programs in their school, and participate in activities that can be used/have been used with students to develop their capacity as leaders in racial equity and affirm and explore their racial and cultural identity.

Target Audience

This session is for any educator that wants to explore authentic ways for White students and Students of Color to develop their leadership skills, engage in collaborative inquiry, and examine the impact of privilege, power, and prejudice through a racial lens.

Presenters

Dr.  Patrick Duffy, Principal Clara Barton Open School, Minneapolis Public Schools
Founder of Dare 2 Be Real and contributing author to “More Courageous Conversations about Race,” by Glenn Singleton

Anthony Galloway, Student Learning Program Specialist, West Metro Education Program
Co-Founder of Dare 2 Be Real and contributing author to “More Courageous Conversations about Race,” by Glenn Singleton

09. The Equity Rubric Project: A Community-Driven Approach to Education Equity - Education Equity Organizing Collaborative.

Presentation      Handout #1      Handout #2

Hear from district, school, and community leaders who are participants in a pilot project now underway to implement an innovative approach to building education equity. Organizing Apprenticeship Project and partners in the Education Equity Organizing Collaborative developed the Equity Rubric as a way to reposition equity at the center of education excellence. With the support of the Minnesota Department of Education, these multiracial community groups are working with four districts to implement the Equity Rubric and a process for identifying disparities and barriers, assessing equity policies and practices, and developing solutions with equity at the center.

Objectives

This presentation will offer participants a story in progress, and one in which they can participate. The Equity Rubric Pilot Project is an opportunity to engage in the real commitment it takes to break down institutional barriers and develop new equity-minded strategies. Participants will see that a process exists that makes achieving education equity possible. They will learn how different strategies – organizing, research, and policymaking – work together for transformative and sustainable change.

Target Audience

This session is appropriate for educators and administrators, researchers, policymakers, community members, and anyone who is interested in a collaborative approach to education equity.

Presenters

Nelima Sitati, Education Equity Rubric Project Coordinator; Organizing Apprenticeship Project,

Elaine Salinas of Migizi Communications, member of the Education Equity Organizing Collaborative.

Vina Kay, Director of Research and Policy, Organizing Apprenticeship Project

10. Round Table - Everyone Can Be Resilient. Dolores H. Fridge, LLC

Abstract

Resilience is the ability to adapt in the face of adversity. As a former school teacher of 14 years in Minneapolis Public Schools, I learned, not only what RESILIENCE, meant, but how to adapt and be successful in difficult and stressful situations. As the Ombudsman for Medtronic, I applied my accumulative skill sets from all of my careers and utilized those skills to advice and support others. Thus this workshop!

The content of the workshop provides specific skill sets that teachers, administrators and other staff can use to support them through stressful, conditions and/or situations. This workshop addresses the conference theme of “Education Equity in Action”, because it will provide specific ways in which anyone can develop his/her “road” to becoming “resilient”.

We all know those educators and all of their support staff have day in and day out “stressors”. This is a highly interactive workshop where participants can share their own experiences, coping mechanisms as well as the recommendations I will provide. This included a specific set of “HowTo‘s” and suggested “Reading List”.

Objective : To provide participants a space to clearly define, discuss and share their work experiences and to help them understand that “Resilience” is a learned process that helps one to stay focused and bounce back in the face of day to day difficult events.

This is a facilitator lead workshop, with both group and individual participation.

Target Audience

Any level educator, administrators and staff.

Presentor:    Dolores H. Fridge, LLC

11. Preparing Effective Teachers of Color for Urban Schools: One University’s Journey - School of Urban Education, Metropolitan State

Presentation    Handout #1    Handout #2

Abstract

This presentation will invite participants into a dialogue about successes and challenges in effectively recruiting, preparing, retaining and licensing teachers of color for urban and diverse suburban schools. Diverse faculty, staff and students from the Urban Teacher Program in the School of Urban Education at Metropolitan State University will describe what’s worked and what we are currently working on improving in our efforts to bring educational equity into action by 1) changing the demographics of who’s teaching, and 2) preparing all teachers with the knowledge, skills and dispositions needed to create equity in their classrooms and schools.

We will briefly discuss the history of the Urban Teacher program and our current student and faculty/staff demographics.

We will then briefly discuss how we work to develop multiculturally competent teachers of color and white teachers through advising, coursework, and urban field experiences. Specifically, we will discuss how we create safe spaces where all teacher candidates learn with and from each other about their own cultural being and those of individuals different from themselves.

Objective – Participants will

  • Be informed of one University’s effort to increase the number of effective, culturally competent Teachers of Color in Minnesota.
  • Learn what elements of Metropolitan States Urban Teacher Program have been successful.
  • Learn the challenges that exist in the process of preparing Teachers of Color and possible action steps.

Target Audience

Teacher Educators, Postsecondary Educators, P-12 educators, Government, community and business leaders who make policy or support efforts to diversify the teacher workforce

Presentors

Rose W. Chu, PhD, Interim Dean, School of Urban Education, Metropolitan State University;

Kirsten Letofsky Assistant Professor, Urban Early Childhood/Elementary Education, School of  Urban Education, Metropolitan State University;

Stanley Brown, EdD Community Faculty

Eric Fotsch, Director of Field Experiences

Taslima Khaled, Director of Advising and Pre-Admissions

Luis Ortega, Community Faculty

Paul Spies, PhD Professor of Secondary Education/Department Chair

12. Our School District’s Journey Toward Equity - Roseville Public Schools

 Presentation

Abstract

Roseville Schools believe an equitable, respectful learning experience is as important as academics to student success. Learn about Roseville’s journey using an equity vision and scorecard to drive the difficult conversations, mobilize change, and monitor progress. Becoming student centric and using cultural competence to differentiate professional development will be highlighted.

Objective: Attendees will

  • Understand the key role of establishing an equity vision and regularly monitoring progress in order to drive change
  • Learn how monitoring progress in order to drive change
  • Appreciate that building strong student relationships and listening to student voices is critical to the equity journey and a method to do this
  • Learn how professional development and individual growth plans can be differentiated based on levels of cultural competence

Target Audience

The presentation will be targeted to school leaders, although the lessons learned apply to any service organization trying to move their organization toward equity.

Presentors

Roseville Public Schools: Peter Olson Skog, Director of Teaching and Learning

Kitty Gogins, Roseville Area School Board

13. Applying Restorative Justice Practices to Students Recommended for Expulsion: An Evidence Based Model for Success - Legal Rights Ctr, MPS, UMN

Presentation               LRC Results            LRC Exec Summary                 LRC UMN report

Abstract

Minneapolis Public Schools and the Legal Rights Center have partnered to successfully utilize restorative family group conferences with students referred for an expulsioin. This session will present the model and data analyzed by University of Minnesota researchers demonstrating improved academic engagement and achievement and decreased suspensions for students of color.

Objective – Audience members will

  • Gain an in-depth understanding of an innovative, evidence based policy and practice which is having a significant positive impact on improving academic engagement and achievement for students of color, while simultaneously decreasing suspension and number of days suspended for students of color.
  • Gain an understanding of the importance of ensuring active participation of students and families in the restorative intervention which leads to ownership of the process and outcomes.
  • Gain an understanding of lessons learned durng the development and implementation of this policy and practice.
  • Be provided resources and support to replicate and expand this model.
  • Advance their knowledge of and capacity for implementing culturally competent supportive school discipline models to close racial disparities.
  • Target Audience

     

    The session is well-suited for all potential audiences of the conference, including educators, students, families, policymakers, and community-based leaders.

    Presentors

    Sarah Davis, Attorney, Legal Rights Center

    Julie Young-Burns, Safe & Drug-Free School Coordinator, Minneapolis Public Schools;

    Barbara McMorris, PhD,  Associate Professor, School of Nursing,  Healthy Youth Development * Prevention Research Center, University of Minnesota

    Kara Beckman, M.A.,  Evaluator and Project Director, Healthy Youth Development * Prevention Research Center,   University of Minnesota Medical School

14. Report - The POP Score: Innovation in Racial Predictive Academic Measurement. SPPS, MMEP

Handout

Abstract

To practitioners one of the important questions surrounding racial predictable academic disparities is, “to what extent are disparities being reduced?”According to Rowan, Hall, and Haycock (2010), to gain an accurate understanding of gaps in student achievement, data must be looked at from various perspectives. Based upon the data available, the 2012 State of Students of Color and American report published by MMEP used several methods of analysis These traditional methods of measurement indicated Students of Color and American Indian students have only seen at best, a marginal closing of racially predictable disparities with their White counter-parts. We argue that the use of traditional methods may not be sufficient for instructional staff as they may not be able to be as specific in representing the extent to which student groups have grown in proficiency relative to where they began. This need lead to the innovation and creation of the Percentage of Progress Score or “POP Score” (Hillstrom, 2012).

The POP Score is a measure of the relative change in proficiency in and between racial groups. The POP methodology utilizes the relative change in proficiency to create an index. We believe by comparing the relative rate of increase for white students against the relative of increase for all other racial classifications gives users the ability to make instructional decisions based on both the trends of their instruction as well as determine areas of strength of current efforts towards decreasing the gap.

This presentation will explain the POP Score and share how Saint Paul Public Schools has developed analysis and protocols to use this tool in informing their Equity work as they strive to eliminate racially predictable outcomes and pursue academic excellence for all.

Objective

To explore a new method and approach in analyzing academic data that historical has provided a limited perspective surround racially predictive academic outcomes.

Target Audience

School Administrators, Superintendents, Research, Data Analysts,Policy Makers, & Governing Officials.

Presenters:

Dr. Rev PM Crowley Hillstrom

Dr. Stacey Gray Akeya

15. Making Sure Education Equity Remains Central to Equity‐Based Teaching & Learning Projects UMN

Handout

Abstract

We will present about an (R&D) initiative centered on creating, delivering, and researching equity‐based teaching/learning projects; engage participants in a consideration of how two of the initiative’s projects conceive of and make equity central to their efforts; and provide concrete ideas for others to do the same in their work.

Objectives

  • To share information about this initiative;
  • To engage session participants in a consideration of how the initiative’s equity-based projects (The CLASSroom Project and the UM-CORPS Project) conceive of and make equity central to their efforts;
  • To provide participants with concrete ideas to do the same in their work

Target Audience

This session is suited for anyone interested in fostering equity-based, high-quality teaching and learning in different contexts (in and out of P-12 schools), and across various individuals within those contexts (developing, novice, and experienced teachers; learners at all levels of their development; parents and families; school and community partnerships).

Presenters

Mark D. Vagle, PhD, Associate Professor, Director, Interdisciplinary Research & Development of Equity‐Based Teaching & Learning Projects, Department of Curriculum & Instruction, University of Minnesota;

Deborah Dillon, Associate Dean, University of Minnesota,

Kara Coffino, UM-Corps Program, Coordinator

16. Empowering Youth Voice for Equity in Education, using Creative Expression and Creative Resistance - Voices for Change!

Handout

We have GREAT news! The students that presented the session at MMEP have now branched out on their own in…Voices for Change!

Voices for Change is a diverse group of young people who courageously share their stories through creative expression. They use Rap, Hip Hop and Spoken Word to connect and build relationships with youth and adults, and grow racial and cultural awareness.

Voices for Change believes in honoring difference and uses their voices to encourage others to take action, creating positive change in their schools and communities.

Attached is a .pdf of the testimonial sheet with pictures.

Abstract

This session explores Anoka-Hennepin School District’s adult/youth 2-year collaboration, which engaged students from 5 high schools, in a greater systemic educational equity initiative. We’ll share pieces of a documentary film, offer participants creative expression & creative resistance tools and discuss strategies for engaging youth in systemic change efforts.

Objective – Participants will come away from this session:

  • inspired by the power of young people to affect change in school communities
  • with the tools of creative expression and creative resistance to engage youth to bridge gaps across difference
  • ready to implement proven strategies to empower youth voice in larger systemic change efforts
  • with the knowledge to reduce racial disparities and create safe and respectful learning environments in schools

Target Audience

This session is designed for administrators, teachers, youth, or anyone who is interested in learning from engaged, powerful, dynamic and creative young people.

Administrators will gain knowledge in how youth can become allies in systemic change efforts. Teachers will learn how youth voice can be a powerful tool in growing culturally competent practice. Young people will be inspired to become creative leaders and change makers in their schools and communities.

Presentors

Carolyn Lakanen and the Student of Voices for Change.

17. Lessons learned, lessons applied: How history informs best practices for the contemporary recruitment retention, and preparation of teachers of color.- UMN

Handout

Abstract

This interactive presentation focuses on the conference theme of teachers of color and primarily addresses how teacher education programs can implement innovative ways to prepare teachers of color for the classroom through a culturally relevant curriculum. The proposed approach to the topic is unconventional; it uses a remarkable but mostly unknown case from history that employed highly innovative collegiate teaching and learning techniques and unique curriculum emphases to produce graduates that changed the history of U.S. civil rights not only through law, but also through teaching.

Objective

The session seeks to communicate through a historic and interactive case study how effective teaching and learning practices prepare students for professional practice within highly diverse communities and classrooms. The objective is to connect a case from history with possibilities for contemporary practice that, in turn, will produce learning and teaching that is personally connected to social justice and racial equity. Attendees will learn how to apply pragmatic approaches to recruiting, retaining, and preparing teachers of color to teach within schools and communities of increased ethnic complexity.

Target Audience

The presentation is suited for teachers of all educational levels, teacher educators, and academic administrators such as principals, department chairs, deans, and provosts.

Presentors

Robert K. Poch, Ph.D, Department of Postsecondary Teaching and Learning, University of Minnesota;

Jade Beauclair, McNair Scholar University of Minnesota

18. Round Table Achieving Academic Excellence: Unveiling the Hidden Curriculum - Buffy Smith

 

Abstract:

Economically disadvantaged and students of color are often unaware of the hidden curriculum of our education system. However, students’ lack of knowledge of the hidden curriculum negatively impacts their performance in the formal curriculum. Therefore, this interactive workshop will provide educators with mentoring strategies for helping students achieve academic success.

Objective:

  • The participants of the round table discussion will learn the definitions of the hidden curriculum, social capital and academic mentoring.
  • The participants will learn the relationship between the hidden curriculum and the formal curriculum.
  • The participants will learn the relationship between the hidden curriculum and institutional privilege.
  • The participants will learn three new cycles of mentoring: advising, advocacy, and apprenticeship (based on my research).

Target Audience:

The target audience is educators who work with middle school, high school and college students.

Presenters

Buffy Smith, Ph.D. University of St. Thomas

19. Leading Courageously for Racial Equity in Minnesota Schools - MN State,Mankato

Handout

Abstract

It takes courage, confidence and a unique skill set to lead Minnesota schools for racial equity. Research on effective schools points to the importance leadership plays in improving results for all students. This session will examine one approach to further develop sitting principals to lead courageously for all students.

Objective

  • Gain an understanding of the urgent need to further develop sitting Minnesota Principals in gaining the skills, self-knowledge, racial competence and courage to ensure that under their leadership, EVERY child fully achieves.
  • Examine leadership beliefs and behaviors that result in increased student achievement.
  • Consider the impact of race, class and culture on the school community and the impact leadership has in creating culture dedicated to high achievement.
  • Explore practice-based techniques for impacting the racial achievement gap.

Target Audience

K-12 leaders

Presenters

Melissa Krull, Ph.D., Minnesota State, Mankato at 7700 France Ave Edina

Candace Raskin, Ed.D Minnesota State, Mankato at 7700 France Ave Edina

20. Report: Native American Student Achievement in Minnesota - MinnCAN

Handout

Abstract

MinnCAN spent 2013 engaging with Native Americans–leaders, educators, parents and students–visiting schools that are beating the odds and examining research. In fall 2013, the education advocacy nonprofit published the ‘Native American Student Achievement in Minnesota’ report, profiling what’s working and providing recommendations for advancing Native student achievement.

Objective

Attendees will leave the session with a baseline understanding of Indian education across Minnesota, anecdotal stories about specific strategies that are working, and an understanding of policy recommendations to strengthen Native student achievement.

Target Audience

All attendees: educators, policymakers and other community members

Presenters

Daniel Sellers, MinnCAN; Jacqueline White, MinnCAN

21. Race Equity Promise to Act: Central Minnesota - MMEP

Presentation      Handout

Abstract

Nationwide and locally, the “Cradle to Career”, collective impact model has been introduced to gather various stakeholders in a process of uncovering key solutions to addressing the opportunity gaps and overall disparities in education.

MMEP partnered with community leader, Mary Sam from Central MN, Central Lakes College, and the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe to develop a community engagement and strategy developing process to complete a Race Equity Promise to Act Plan. Assisting with data analysis and case studies, Tammy Quist (MMEP Race Equity Fellow) and Jennifer Godinez (Associate Director of MMEP, education equity planning expert) have been facilitating team meetings to share promising practices in cradle to career, collective impact models from across the country, race equity-focused education strategy development, and community engagement organizing.

Objective:

  • Share qualitative data from Phase 1 of the Race Equity Action Planning process with the Nay Ah Shing, Onamia, and Isle school communities in the Mille Lacs area.
  • Share updates in the Race Equity planning process for Phase 2.
  • Explore “Lessons Learned” from engaging community in visioning in any collective impact strategy model to close gaps in education outcomes.
  • Share the overall model that MMEP is developing in partnership with the Native American community.

Target Audience:

Community members partnering with education systems for race equity, Researchers who are exploring innovative community engagement and race equity planning process models, Practitioners in collective impact education models Policymakers interested in the perspective of communities of color, Native American community and education reform addressing race equity.

Presentors

Tammy Quist, MMEP Race Equity Fellow

Mary Sam, community leader – Central MN, Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe ,Central Lakes College

Jennifer Godinez, Associate Director of MMEP, education equity planning expert

22. Undertaking the Work of Closing the Achievement Gap - St Louis Pk School

Handout

Abstract

Closing the Achievement Gap is a priority. We are developing a strategic plan that includes a data dashboard, a guaranteed and viable curriculum, instructional leadership and high-quality professional development. Come to a participatory session to learn how to integrate multiple programs into a common system focused on the same goal.

Objective

The format will be a presentation with table discussions and sharing out. Participants will be invited to relate our plans to their contexts and contribute their insights.

Target Audience

The session is intended for all levels of educators in K-12 education, from district office to principals and teachers. The session will also be of interest to educational researchers, policy-makers, and agencies that work with schools and districts on systemic change.

Presentors

Freida Bailey, Principal on Special Assignment, St. Louis Park Public Schools,

Prachee Mukherjee,Director of Assessment, Research and Evaluation;

Kari Ross, Director of Teaching and Learning

23. School-to-Prison Pipeline - Hamline Univ

Handout

Abstract

The primary purpose of the presentation is to expose the institutional racism and classicism that feed the school-to-prison pipeline and to illustrate its very real impact on a family who lived it. In addition, we will examine what K-12 schools and schools of education must do to resist and ultimately dismantle the School-to-Prison Pipeline.

Objective

  • Conference participants will learn that schools can (and should) be spaces for healing, rehabilitation and empowerment, not preparation for prison. School curricula can (and should) emphasize peer-mediation, conflict studies, restorative and social justice initiatives, and service learning opportunities.
  • They will also learn that schools must challenge their understandings of privilege and social justice and nudge them toward becoming agents of social change.
  • Teacher educators will learn that they must call attention to – not evade or minimize – such dangerous trends as the school-to-prison pipeline. We must prepare our teacher candidates to be actively antiracist and culturally responsive in their teaching.

Target Audience

For anyone who is involved with K-12 schools (students, parents, teachers, administrators, teacher education faculty). The presentation is assessable to those with little or a lot of knowledge on the topic.

Presenters

Letitia Basford, Hamline University

Joe Lewis, Hamline University

Philip Borer

24. Deconstructing Out of School Suspensions From the Perspective of Black Students, Their Parents, and Educators - UMN

Presentation            Handout

Abstract

Reducing out-of-school suspensions requires communication amongst those involved. 27 cases, each comprised of a suspended Black child, parent and the involved educator were examined for patters of convergence and divergence in perspectives. Findings will provide opportunities to hear their voices and discuss how we can enhance Black children’s school success.

Objective

  • To introduce findings from a study examining the varying perspectivds across children, their parents and educators involved in out-of-school suspensions regarding their experiences, reasons for suspension, and recommendations for alternative ways to discipline children.
  • To consider the implications of these multiple perspectives for designing strategies to reduce out-of-school suspensions by revising policies and practices with students, their parents and educators.

Target Audience

  • This session targets educators, students and their families, community leaders providing support for minority youth and families, and policy makers. Our findings will raise voices and needs of students, families, and educators involved in out-of-school suspension to better support Black children and enhance their school success.

Presentors

Misa Kayama, MSW;

Priscilla Gibson, MSW, LICSW, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Minnesota

Wendy Haight, PhD

Jane Marshall, PhD

Robert Wilson, MSW, Graduate Research Assistant